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Message d'origine par : Chris Green ,

Texte:

There is no really good way to test a part based on a visual inspection.  If you see any damaged, disformed, or "fried" components, then the chances are, it's bad.  Sometimes, though failure can happen on a non-visual level. For example, a bad solder joint (Solder holds every component to the board, and forms the electronical connection) which can be virtualy undetectable, or a bad intergrated circuit, such as damage to a chip that isn't visible on the outside.  The best way to test anything it to plug it in.  Note, if you are going to buy a case, keep in mind that each logic board has it's own specific case.

Logic Board Info (Based on date on board, with name, and nick-names)

1999 - The original powermac G4 (Graphite, "AGP Graphics", "Yikes!")

Early 2000 - See Above

Late 2000 - Powermac G4 Quicksilver (Digital Audio, Gigabit Ethernet, Quicksilver)

2001 - Powermac G4 Quicksilver (See Above)

2002, Green - Powermac G4 Quicksilver (See above, except includes LDS)

2002, Navy Blue - PowerMac G4 MDD (MDD)

2003, Navy Blue - PowerMac G4 MDD (MDD, some may have a firewire 800 port, as well as 2 firewire 400 ports)

2004, Navy Blue - PowerMac G4 MDD (MDD, Last PowerMac G4 Produced)

Statut:

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