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Version actuelle par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device needs to match the systems SATA ports connection or be slower.
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device needs to match the systems SATA ports connection or be slower.
* A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) system
* A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA III (6.0 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible)
* A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will '''NOT work reliably''' in a SATA I (1.5 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are NOT downwardly compatible)compatible). The same logic applies for SATA III devices. They will not work reliably in either a SATA I or SATA II system.
* A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will '''NOT work reliably''' in a SATA I (1.5 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are NOT downwardly compatible)compatible). The same logic applies for SATA III devices. They will not work reliably in either a SATA I or SATA II system.
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these to work in SATA I systems, a few SATA III drives had them allowing to set the drive to SATA I). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device needs to match the systems SATA ports connection or be slower. So a
* A
fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA II system.(3.0 Gb/s) system
*
A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA III (6.0 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but acompatible)
* A
fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will NOT'''NOT work reliablyreliably''' in a SATA I (1.5 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are '''NOT'''NOT downwardly compatible).compatible)
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device needs to match the systems SATA ports connection or be slower. So a
* A
fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA II system.(3.0 Gb/s) system
*
A fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will work in a SATA III (6.0 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but acompatible)
* A
fixed SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) device will NOT'''NOT work reliablyreliably''' in a SATA I (1.5 Gb/s) system (SATA devices are '''NOT'''NOT downwardly compatible).compatible)
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these to work in SATA I systems, a few SATA III drives had them allowing to set the drive to SATA I). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device mustneeds to match the systems SATA ports connectionconnection or be slower. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will NOT work reliably in a SATA I system (SATA devices are '''NOT''' downwardly compatible).
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device mustneeds to match the systems SATA ports connectionconnection or be slower. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will NOT work reliably in a SATA I system (SATA devices are '''NOT''' downwardly compatible).
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these to work in SATA I systems, a few SATA III drives had them allowing to set the drive to SATA I). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will NOT work reliably in a SATA I system (SATA devices are '''NOT''' downwardly compatible).
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have thesethese to work in SATA I systems, a few SATA III drives had them allowing to set the drive to SATA I). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have thesethese to work in SATA I systems, a few SATA III drives had them allowing to set the drive to SATA I). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will NOT work reliably in a SATA I system (SATA devices are '''NOTNOT''' downwardly compatible).
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will NOT work reliably in a SATA I system (SATA devices are '''NOTNOT''' downwardly compatible).
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III systemsystem (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will notNOT work reliably in a SATA I systemsystem (SATA devices are '''NOT'' downwardly compatible).
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III systemsystem (SATA devices are upwardly compatible), but a fixed SATA II device will notNOT work reliably in a SATA I systemsystem (SATA devices are '''NOT'' downwardly compatible).
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these). Later on the many device makers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}
 
Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.
 
So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system, but a fixed SATA II device will not work in a SATA I system.
 
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these). Later on the many device wasmakers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these). Later on the many device wasmakers added circuitry able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.
 
OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open

Contribution d'origine par : Dan ,

Texte:

@Mads - So I can put a V8 engine into my VW Beatle then ;-}

Sadly it's not so simple. The SATA standard over the years has been improved. The way the different versions of the standard interoperate is not as straight forward as one would like.

So lets see if we can clarify: A '''fixed SATA''' device must match the systems SATA ports connection. So a fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA II system. A fixed SATA II device will work in a SATA III system, but a fixed SATA II device will not work in a SATA I system.

Now to confuse you! So far we've been talking about '''FIXED''' speed devices. Well, some hardware makers want to sell their stuff to a more people so they offered a jumper on the device to allow one to slow down the device to match the system (SATA II drives often have these). Later on the device was able to sense the systems I/O speed so it would automatically adjust to the system. This is true for a few HD's & SSD's. So one needs to check the spec sheet. If it states only one speed then its fixed. As a reference here's the Seagate SSHD drive's spec sheet: [http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/sshd-fam/desktop-sshd/en-gb/docs/desktop-sshd-data-sheet-ds1788-2-1308gb.pdf|Desktop SSHD] Look at the line ''SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)'' note the listing shows ''6.0/3.0/1.5'' which are the SATA III, SATA II & SATA I I/O speeds. Make sure the spec sheet states this if not it's not auto sensing.

OK, so you got the drive in and maybe it even allowed you to install the OS onto it so why are you telling me its wrong when it works? This gets into I/O errors! A mismatched drive will often encounter heavy I/O errors as the interface can't sustain the data flow. If the data flow is slow (installing from a slow CD/DVD or USB drive) the flow is not heavy enough to create many errors. But once the OS is installed an app or the indexer process will fire up causing the system to over heat as the CPU & the drive are in a data fight between the constant reads & writes as most fail so they need to go into retry.

Statut:

open