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Version actuelle par : electrovert ,

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This amp has no tubes...
 
This is a grounded collector Amp. The two large caps form a center tap for the power supply which is connected to the speaker terminal. So This is cap coupled amp. Therefore if you drive high currents of low frequencies the large caps will fail...it is a very graceful failure. The signal will just fade away. The lower the impedance of your load (speakers) the faster this will happen. Replacing these caps should put you back in service...
 
Cap coupled amps sound bouncy...Pulses are accelerated and then fall off...So the choice of replacement cap will effect the tonal quality of the amp. The best choice would be splitting the required value over several small caps connected in parallel.
 
Note replacing the caps requires removing the amp circuit boards...which means disconnecting the heat sinks...lots of little bits, and heat sink pastpaste. I would recommend replacing all the screws you remove because they will disintegrate on contact.
Note replacing the caps requires removing the amp circuit boards...which means disconnecting the heat sinks...lots of little bits, and heat sink pastpaste. I would recommend replacing all the screws you remove because they will disintegrate on contact.
 
Replacing the twisted output wires with OFC similar temp rated wire or even untwisting the OEM wire can't hurt either.
 
This amp has huge potential, by design, but crippled by implementation.
 
I suggest taking good (clear) pictures of everything before you pull it apart. Do one side at a time. Have a container for all the bits. Avoid bending the power transistors leads once you remove the screws holding the circuit board from the heat sink.
 
Or just buy another one for $250

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open

Message d'origine par : electrovert ,

Texte:

This amp has no tubes...

This is a grounded collector Amp.  The two large caps form a center tap for the power supply which is connected to the speaker terminal.  So This is cap coupled amp.  Therefore if you drive high currents of low frequencies the large caps will fail...it is a very graceful failure.  The signal will just fade away.  The lower the impedance of your load (speakers) the faster this will happen.  Replacing these caps should put you back in service...

Cap coupled amps sound bouncy...Pulses are accelerated and then fall off...So the choice of replacement cap will effect the tonal quality of the amp.  The best choice would be splitting the required value over several small caps connected in parallel.

Note replacing the caps requires removing the amp circuit boards...which means disconnecting the heat sinks...lots of little bits, and heat sink past.  I would recommend replacing all the screws you remove because they will disintegrate on contact.

Replacing the twisted output wires with OFC similar temp rated wire or even untwisting the OEM wire can't hurt either.

This amp has huge potential, by design, but crippled by implementation.

I suggest taking good (clear) pictures of everything before you pull it apart.  Do one side at a time.  Have a container for all the bits. Avoid bending the power transistors leads once you remove the screws holding the circuit board from the heat sink.

Or just buy another one for $250

Statut:

open