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Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of high spec systems come with the Radeon 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The difference between the consumer 7570 vs. business 7570 is the secondary port; the consumer card in the XPS is HDMI/DVI and the business card is full size DP/HDMI. Same junk card, different ports. For onboard, it’s usually bad RAM.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are notorious for failing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it has a joke dye like the GT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning - it’s good one day and dead the next. Personally if I got something like this again and it had one of these GPUs I wouldn’t throw it out if it worked, but I’d probably throw it out and blank it off if it had ana fatal issue so I can shop around and get a GPU I like since the mainstream CPUs ALL have onboard graphics.
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are notorious for failing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it has a joke dye like the GT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning - it’s good one day and dead the next. Personally if I got something like this again and it had one of these GPUs I wouldn’t throw it out if it worked, but I’d probably throw it out and blank it off if it had ana fatal issue so I can shop around and get a GPU I like since the mainstream CPUs ALL have onboard graphics.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver and booting on the Intel onboard without the GPU installed (Dell has a POST block with a GPU installed) so it can be removed and reinstalled with the AMD or WHQL (Windows) driver. '''We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.'''
 
If you don’t want to chance it, these are your choices:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of high spec systems come with the Radeon 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The difference between the consumer 7570 vs. business 7570 is the secondary port; the consumer card in the XPS is HDMI/DVI and the business card is full size DP/HDMI. Same junk card, different ports. For onboard, it’s usually bad RAM.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are notorious for failing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it has a joke dye like the GT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning - it’s good one day and dead the next. Personally if I got something like this again and it had one of these GPUs I wouldn’t throw it out if it worked, but I’d probably throw it out and blank it off if it had an issue so I can shop around and get a GPU I like since the mainstream CPUs ALL have onboard graphics.
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are notorious for failing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it has a joke dye like the GT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning - it’s good one day and dead the next. Personally if I got something like this again and it had one of these GPUs I wouldn’t throw it out if it worked, but I’d probably throw it out and blank it off if it had an issue so I can shop around and get a GPU I like since the mainstream CPUs ALL have onboard graphics.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver and booting on the Intel onboard without the GPU installed (Dell has a POST block with a GPU installed) so it can be removed and reinstalled with the AMD or WHQL (Windows) driver. '''We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.'''
 
If you don’t want to chance it, these are your choices:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPUhigh spec systems come with the Radeon 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profileconsumer 7570 vs. business 7570 is the port type on a lot of them -secondary port; the low profileconsumer card in the XPS is usually DPHDMI/DVI and the conversionbusiness card is HDMIfull size DP/HDMI. Same junk card, different ports. For onboard, it’s usually bad RAM.
Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPUhigh spec systems come with the Radeon 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profileconsumer 7570 vs. business 7570 is the port type on a lot of them -secondary port; the low profileconsumer card in the XPS is usually DPHDMI/DVI and the conversionbusiness card is HDMIfull size DP/HDMI. Same junk card, different ports. For onboard, it’s usually bad RAM.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. Theseheat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost alwaysfailing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it’s paired withit has a joke GPU dye that shouldn’t exist like the GT420. You never get anyGT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s allit’s good until you reboot itone day and makedead the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it diednext.
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. Theseheat - it’s not uncommon to get these low profile conversion machines with evidence it WAS once a machine with a GPU from the factory - that’s how you know the GPU died. The problem is these low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost alwaysfailing due to insufficient cooling without warning unless it’s paired withit has a joke GPU dye that shouldn’t exist like the GT420. You never get anyGT420 (which shouldn’t exist). It’s made worse by the fact there is often no warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s allit’s good until you reboot itone day and makedead the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it diednext.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removingbooting on the cardIntel onboard without the GPU installed may(Dell has a POST block with a GPU installed) so it can be enough to remove it,removed and then you can try againreinstalled with the WindowsAMD or WHQL driver and the AMD(Windows) driver. We'''We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.permanently.'''
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removingbooting on the cardIntel onboard without the GPU installed may(Dell has a POST block with a GPU installed) so it can be enough to remove it,removed and then you can try againreinstalled with the WindowsAMD or WHQL driver and the AMD(Windows) driver. We'''We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.permanently.'''
 
You have a choiceIf you don’t want to chance it, these are your choices:
You have a choiceIf you don’t want to chance it, these are your choices:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU dye that shouldn’t exist like the GT420. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removing the card without the GPU installed may be enough to remove it, and then you can try again with the Windows WHQL driver and the AMD driver. We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removing the card without the GPU installed may be enough to remove it, and then you can try again with the Windows WHQL driver and the AMD driver. We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver. Just don’t be surprised if it fails again permanently.
 
You have a choice:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU dye that shouldn’t existexist like the GT420. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU dye that shouldn’t existexist like the GT420. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removing the card without the GPU installed may be enough to remove it, and then you can try again with the Windows WHQL driver and the AMD driver. We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver.
 
You have a choice:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
If you’re lucky it’s just a bad driver issue and removing the card without the GPU installed may be enough to remove it, and then you can try again with the Windows WHQL driver and the AMD driver. We don’t know what card you have explicitly, so you will need to find out and locate the correct driver.
 
You have a choice:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Remove the card and switch to onboard video (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869]
 
[image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* SwitchRemove the card and switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
* SwitchRemove the card and switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869][image|2019868image|2019869]

[image|2019868
]
[image|2019869][image|2019868image|2019869]

[image|2019868
]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.
 
[image|2019869][image|2019868]

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have
** Not recommended for low end cards
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
** [https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=8rnt8&oscode=wb64a&productcode=xps-8500|Required driver]
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The majority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is a low profile GPU converted to work with a different bracket. There are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system. The only difference between the conversion and low profile is the port type on a lot of them - the low profile is usually DP and the conversion is HDMI.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have
** Not recommended for low end cards
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPUmajority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is designed fora low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modifiedGPU converted to work with these towers by changing thea different bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurationsThere are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.
Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPUmajority of factory GPU systems come with the 7570, which is designed fora low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modifiedGPU converted to work with these towers by changing thea different bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurationsThere are other cards that don’t do this, but they were all optional CTO upgrades. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have
** Not recommended for low end cards
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPU is designed for low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modified to work with these towers by changing the bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurations. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just failsfails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just failsfails as you found out. It’s all good until you reboot it and make the GPU do more then it’s already doing when it died.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have
** Not recommended for low end cards
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPU is designed for low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modified to work with these towers by changing the bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurations. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.
 
The low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs are kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this since the cooling is almost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a joke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning with these things - it just fails.
 
You have a choice:
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have (Not recommended; may fail+it’s
** Not recommended for
low end)end cards
** find a good used card that matches what you have (Not recommended; may fail+it’s
** Not recommended for
low end)end cards
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Modifié par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPU is designed for low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modified to work with these towers by changing the bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurations. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.
 
These GPUsThe low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs often failare kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this due to that, and tend to fail whensince the systemcooling is rebooted soalmost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a sudden failure rather then one youjoke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning withwith these things - it just fails.
These GPUsThe low end GPU Dell shipped with these often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These low profile GPUs often failare kind of notorious as a whole for dying like this due to that, and tend to fail whensince the systemcooling is rebooted soalmost always insufficient unless it’s paired with a sudden failure rather then one youjoke GPU that shouldn’t exist. You never get any warning withwith these things - it just fails.
 
You have a choice: Remove the GPU (requires driver change), find a good used one (not recommended; may fail+it’s low end) or you can buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change). If you don’t need it but got it because you had to, I would just go to the onboard video and not install a new GPU and remove the port covers.
You have a choice: Remove the GPU (requires driver change), find a good used one (not recommended; may fail+it’s low end) or you can buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change). If you don’t need it but got it because you had to, I would just go to the onboard video and not install a new GPU and remove the port covers.
 
* GPU ONLY - Remove the GPU (requires driver change)
** find a good used card that matches what you have (Not recommended; may fail+it’s low end)
* Buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change)
* Switch to onboard video and remove the port covers (requires driver change)
If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open

Contribution d'origine par : Nick ,

Texte:

Are you using an Intel onboard (IGP) or dGPU (GPGPU) machine? The OEM GPU is designed for low profile machines and has abysmal cooling; it’s just been modified to work with these towers by changing the bracket. The 7570 is one of the known low profile conversion configurations. The problem is going to be caused by something entirely different if it’s an i5/onboard configured system.

These GPUs often die due to the small cooler and GPU heat output being bad enough under load it cannot quickly dissipate the heat. These GPUs often fail like this due to that, and tend to fail when the system is rebooted so it’s a sudden failure rather then one you get warning with.

You have a choice: Remove the GPU (requires driver change), find a good used one (not recommended; may fail+it’s low end) or you can buy a modern midrange GPU and replace it (requires driver change). If you don’t need it but got it because you had to, I would just go to the onboard video and not install a new GPU and remove the port covers.

If it didn’t ship with a GPU, the RAM is bad. Get a set of DDR3L 1600MHz - at least 16GB of it especially if you plan to keep the computer in the long run. If not, remove the bad module as long as it’s reasonable - think 4-8GB of RAM after finding the dead module.

Statut:

open