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Water fixtures and their piping, as well as the myriad of components that keep them flowing.

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How do I disconnect my shower drain?

I've got a bathtub/shower that drains incredibly slowly. I've tried what's suggested here to no avail. Fortunately I'm able to get to the plumbing, but some of it's quite rusted and I can't seem to get it apart. Here's the entire contraption:

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And here it is after successfully removing what looks like an overflow pipe (that actually isn't going anywhere anymore):

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The above photos are two different angles of the same thing.

Any suggestions on how to get this contraption apart so I can clean the trap?

Update 11/9/16:

I was able to cut out the old cast iron trap with a sawzall:

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It's a wonder that things drained at all:

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However, there wasn't enough room to fit a flexible trap back in. I was able to put in a 90 degree elbow with flexible 1 1/2" pipe, but the elbow plus the flexible trap is far too large to fit into the available space. Is it ok to not have a trap, or do I need to figure out how to get a trap added back in? I do now have a mesh screen in the tub that I'd assume will catch hair and any other large items and prevent them from going down the drain. Any thoughts from plumbing experts?

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Une réponse ! View the answer J'ai le même problème

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@luke, Yes there should be a trap to prevent dangerous sewer gasses from entering the home.

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Solution retenue

Luke cut the old trap out as close to the trap as possible (leave pipe as long as possible sticking out of stack) so you can use a rubber joiner with gear clamps to reattach new trap. If need be you can also cut the brass pipe and use a second joiner on that connection on new trap. All parts required can be found at hardware store, Home depot, Lowes, etc. Take the pic's with you to the plumbing dept. and the staff should be able to set you up with all supplies you need. Links below show how joiner/fernco can be used to simplify pluming in new trap. Good luck.

I hope this helped you out, if so let me know by pressing the helpful button.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=fernco+on...

http://www.homedepot.com/b/Plumbing-Pipe...

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Thanks for the advice! I'll report back with how it goes!

par

Well @luke, where's that report? We're holding our breath and turning blue waiting ;-)

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@lpfaff1 Good to see you back at ;-) Sent you an email just a bit ago.

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You definitely need a trap. The trap prevents sewer gas from entering the house. The vent provides a vacuum breaker that prevents water from being siphoned out of the trap when you use the shower. The only exception to this is if your shower is on a greywater system of some sort, and not connected to a sewer or septic system. From the pictures it looks like the vent is the nearest pipe, and the brass pipe is the drain pipe from the tub, both main and overflow. Can you dig into the material in the bottom of the square hole and gain enough room for a trap? Maybe borrow a small jackhammer if it's concrete or other hard material? It looks like there would be enough room if you did that. The cast iron trap is larger than the new one you would use (probably ABS). Or you can fashion one out of flexible rubber 90 degree bends, in a pinch. Not the best way, though, as that would create rough spots for hair to get caught in.

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Luke Soules sera éternellement reconnaissant.
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